Sumerian Main Page

The History of Ancient Sumeria (Sumer) including its cities, kings, religions culture and contributions or civilization

Topics

Abraham and Shinar

Calendar

Cosmology

Culture and Contributions

Cuneiform

Downloadable Cuneiform

Dictionary of  Words

Emergent Cities

Ensi - Lugal

First Historical Personalities

Flood Legends in History

Flood Story

Gods

Houses

Kish

Language

Language Two

Laws

Literary Sources

Mythologies

Sargon The Great

Shuruppak

Sumerian Creation

Territorial States

The City of Ebla

The City of Larsa

The City of Ur

Timeline

Wheel

 Sumerian Writings

Advice about Farming

Contracts (Legal)

Epic of Gilgamesh

Enki and Ninursag

Enki, The God

Hymn to Ishtar

Lament for Ur

Poem Of The Sufferer

Prayer to Shamash

Prayer to Every God

Reforms of Urukagina

Sumerian Creation

Sumerian Inscription

Sumerian King List

Sumerian Proverbs 

The Art of Sumeria

Sumerian Art

"Harpist from Ur"

 by:  Liliana Osses Adams

Other Mesopotamian Peoples

Akkad

Amorites

Assyrians

Babylonians

Chaldeans

Hittites

Kassites

Mesopotamia

 

Map

 

reconstruction_ur.gif (74457 bytes)

Ziggurat

reconstruction-zig.gif (82749 bytes)

Ziggurat

 

Please Help Keep Us On the Web.

We are a Non-Profit Organization and the cost of continuing is becoming more than we can handle.  Therefore, we are asking you to please donate anything you can to help keep us on the web

Please Help Click Here

Care to express an opinion on a current or past historical event?

Need to ask a question from our many visitors?

Just visit our Message Board and leave your message.

Message Board

Weekly Poll

Sumerian Kish

The once-majestic city of Kish is today only ruins. It lies between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, about 8 miles (13 kilometers) east of the site of Babylon in what is now Iraq. Inscriptions in the ruins state that it was "the first city founded after the Flood." As the traditional first capital of the Sumerians, Kish was an early center of civilization (see Babylonia and Assyria).

In ancient times, the area was fertile. The Sumerians settled along a bend of the Euphrates River. They built a fortified city, more than 5 miles (8 kilometers) long and almost 2 miles (3 kilometers) wide. Until as late as the time of King Sargon I (about 2300 BC), Kish dominated the Near East. Then it declined because the Euphrates changed its course. Finally it was abandoned, and desert sand covered its ruins.

Archaeologists excavated the ruins between 1923 and 1933. Digging to virgin soil, 60 feet (18 meters) below the top of the mound, the expedition found remains of several cultures, from Neolithic times to the Christian Era. A band of alluvial soil about 40 feet (12 meters) below the surface indicated that Kish had been flooded in about 3200 BC. Many take this to be evidence of the great Biblical flood. Astounding also was the discovery, below the flood stratum, of a four-wheeled chariot, the earliest known wheeled vehicle. Other discoveries showing the highly developed Sumerian civilization were thick-walled temple towers, canals, and a library with some of the earliest known writing.

Main Page

World History Center