Recognition Of The Independence Of Cuba
Author: Various
Date: 1898
 

Recognition Of The Independence Of Cuba

[The following resolution not only recognized the independence of Cuba,
but authorized the levying of war upon Spain in order to force upon that
country a similar recognition. The resolution was passed in response to a
message sent to Congress by President McKinley, April 11, 1898, asking for
permission to intervene in Cuba.]

Joint Resolution for the recognition of the independence of the people of
Cuba, demanding that the Government of Spain relinquish its authority and
government in the Island of Cuba, and to withdraw its land and naval forces
from Cuba and Cuban waters, and directing the President of the United States
to use the land and naval forces of the United States to carry these
resolutions into effect.

Whereas, the abhorrent conditions which have existed for more than three
years in the Island of Cuba, so near our own borders, have shocked the moral
sense of the people of the United States, have been a disgrace to Christian
civilization, culminating, as they have, in the destruction of a United States
battle - ship, with two hundred and sixty - six of its officers and crew,
while on a friendly visit in the harbor of Havana, and can not longer be
endured, as has been set forth by the President of the United States in his
message to Congress of April eleventh, eighteen hundred and ninety - eight,
upon which the action of Congress was invited: Therefore,


Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, First. That the people of the Island of Cuba
are, and of right ought to be, free and independent.

Second. That it is the duty of the United States to demand, and the
Government of the United States does hereby demand, that the Government of
Spain at once relinquish its authority and government in the Island of Cuba,
and withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters.

Third. That the President of the United States be, and he hereby is,
directed and empowered to use the entire land and naval forces of the United
States, and to call into the actual service of the United States, the militia
of the several States, to such extent as may be necessary to carry these
resolutions into effect.

Fourth. That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or
intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said Islands
except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination, when that
is accomplished, to leave the government and control of the Island to its
people.

Approved, April 20, 1898.

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